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Sarah Walton Salt Glaze Artist

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Sarah Walton is a potter who lives and works in Alciston, near Lewes, East Sussex, England.

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She has run a pottery there since 1975 using a large oil-fired saltglaze kiln.

She studied Fine Art at Chelsea from 1960-64 and Studio Pottery at Harrow from 1971-73.

Sarah acknowledges a debt to mediaeval pots, the arts of Mesopotamia and South-East Asia, to Neolithic Art, to Western Painting, sculpture, architecture, music, literature, poetry, wit, philosophy and religion, and to innumerable people through the years, especially Weislaw Pilawski and Irene Milburn.

Landscape is a theme in her work. She has walked, drawn and painted it since childhood and this lies behind her evolution of birdbaths which she has made since 1984. Her ceramics are represented in 13 museums in the UK and she has won 5 awards. Her work can be bought at Contemporary Applied Arts and Contemporary Ceramics in London, The Scottish Gallery in Edinburgh and The Leach Pottery, St Ives.

Her studio gallery is open most weekdays, 11am - 5pm. If you are coming a long way and/or wish to call on a weekend please telephone first on 01323 811517.

Biography
Born 1945
Grew up and was educated in London

1960-64
Chelsea Art School (Painting)

1966-71
Middlesex Hospital, London (SRN)

1971-73
Harrow Art School (Harrow Diploma in Studio Pottery)
Apprenticeships with David Leach and Zelda Mowat

In 1975
Set up her own studio at Alciston, Sussex where she works as a potter, using a saltglaze kiln.

Awards:

1975
Crafts Council Grant to establish a workshop

1978
South East Arts Bursary Award

1990
John Ruskin Craft Bursary

1993
South East Arts Major Award

1998
South East Arts Award


Work in Public Collections

Victoria & Albert Museum, London
Crafts Council, London
Contemporary Arts Society, London
South East Arts Collection, Hove Museum, Sussex
Castle Museum, Nottingham
Crafts Centre, Northern Arts, Cleveland
Norwich Museum, Norfolk
City Museum & Art Gallery, Stoke-on-Trent
Newport Museum, Gwent, Wales
Arts Centre, University of South Wales, Aberystwyth
Paisley Museum, Scotland
Glasgow Museum, Scotland
Allen Gallery, Alton, Hampshire


Work may be seen on the following databases and Internet:
www.studiopottery.co.uk/html/pgal-swal.html
The Crafts Council Database 44A Pentonville Rd, London, N19 HF
Axis:
www.axisartists.org.uk

Associations

Crafts Council Index, London
Contemporary Applied Arts, London (ex Committee Members)
Craftsmen Potters Association of Great Britain


The forms of these birdbaths are prompted by landscape, especially that of the South Downs and the Lake District. I've tried to recreate on a small scale what I've seen on a larger one there. As important has been the influence of Romanesque and Neolithic art.

Here are some of my latest pieces for sale:


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sarah_walton_1_mountain_birdbath_small.jpg


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My father was a musician at Glyndebourne and so I spent a lot of my early childhood around the South Downs enjoying their sensuous hollows and profiles.Then one Easter I was introduced to the Lake District with it's sharp cold air and thin topsoil. Tarns lay circled amongst hills.

These could dance in sunlight or lie in deep stillness.The often weather-beaten qualities of rural buildings such as barns, stone-walling and Saxon churches have further given me a language and influenced the way I choose to use materials.

It is often in a dormant Winter garden that these pieces look their best.  Their fabric is Saltglazed ceramic which makes them quite un-porous. Should the water in them freeze, their upper forms are such it has room to expand outwards and upwards. 

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Image courtesy of Jacqui Hurst

When I began making the birdbaths in 1986 I had a clear intention to make forms that were more sensuous than I'd dared attempt before.
 
When onlookers say they want to touch them I realise I've communicated my intention. I was also sure I wanted them to be pieces about stillness and tenderness, and that I'd use austerity to serve those aims. Because of this I recommend them in some instances, as memorial pieces, when a bronze plaque with name and dates may be inlaid into the oak of the base. In even fewer cases the birdbath itself, because it is a hollow form, may with very slight modification become a cremation urn.

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sarah_walton_no_2_bb_dark_red_-_3_small.jpg

sarah_walton_no_4_bb_-_small_on_burnt_oak_base_-_c_small.jpg

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Sarah Walton Salt Glaze Pottery
Sarah Walton Salt Glaze Pottery
The forms of these birdbaths are prompted by landscape, especially that of the South Downs and the Lake District. I've tried to recreate on a small scale what I've seen on a larger one there. As...
You are viewing results 1 to 1 of 1
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